Difference between revisions of "Female Trouble/Fun Facts"

From The Grindhouse Cinema Database

< Female Trouble
 
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* The birth scene was saved until the end of shooting, when Dreamlander Susan Lowe gave birth to a son. The umbilical cord was fashioned out of prophylactics filled with liver, while the baby (Ramsey McLean) was doused in fake blood. The scene created quite a scandal for Lowe's mother-in-law, who arrived on the set in a state of confusion.
 
* The birth scene was saved until the end of shooting, when Dreamlander Susan Lowe gave birth to a son. The umbilical cord was fashioned out of prophylactics filled with liver, while the baby (Ramsey McLean) was doused in fake blood. The scene created quite a scandal for Lowe's mother-in-law, who arrived on the set in a state of confusion.
 
* Although Dawn Davenport received the death penalty at the end of the film, capital punishment in the United States was suspended from 1972 to 1976 due to the Supreme Court's ruling in the case of Furman v. Georgia.
 
* Although Dawn Davenport received the death penalty at the end of the film, capital punishment in the United States was suspended from 1972 to 1976 due to the Supreme Court's ruling in the case of Furman v. Georgia.
* On the 2004 DVD Director's Special Comments, Waters states that the original working title of the film was Rotten Mind, Rotten Face.
+
* On the 2004 DVD Director's Special Comments, Waters states that the original working title of the film was Rotten Mind, Rotten Face. In his autobiography ''Shock Value: A Tasteful Book About Bad Taste'', he wrote that he changed the title when he realized some critic might title his review, "Rotten Mind, Rotten Face, Rotten Movie."
  
  
 
[[Category: Fun Facts]]
 
[[Category: Fun Facts]]

Latest revision as of 20:40, 8 November 2019

  • A scene was filmed in which Concetta (Cookie Mueller) burst into the courtroom in an attempt to rescue Dawn Davenport ('Divine'). According to John Waters, the scene was "technically bad" (visible boom mic, light poles, etc.) and not included in any released version.
  • Dawn Davenport's stage performance is based upon an act performed by Divine at San Francisco's Palace Theatre. Divine would wheel a shopping cart full of mackerel on stage and hurl them into the audience while claiming responsibility for various high-profile crimes.
  • Many of the principal actors' and crews' parents played the jurors in the final courtroom scene, including the mother and brother of David Lochary (Donald Dasher) and the mother of set designer Vincent Peranio.
  • John Waters still has the "lectric' chair" and keeps it in his Baltimore home.
  • The female prisoner kissing Dawn in her cell at the end of the movie previously appeared in Pink Flamingos (1972) as "Chick with a Dick." The actress is a male-to-female transsexual.
  • This film marks the last time that John Waters would work with his friend and regular David Lochary. Lochary bled to death while under the influence of PCP before he could appear in Waters' next picture, Desperate Living (1977).
  • Director Trademark: ['John Waters'] [manson] A model helicopter made by Tex Watson is visible in the opening sequence.
  • Although released in 1974 the copyright date at the end of the credits is MCMXCIX or 1999.
  • The lyrics to the title song "Female Trouble", sung by Divine, were written by Waters and set to a pre-existing piece of music.
  • The unique production design is by Dreamlander Vincent Peranio, who created Davenport's apartment in a condemned suite above a friend's store.
  • Divine chose to perform his own stunts, the most difficult of which involved doing flips on a trampoline during his nightclub act. Waters took Divine to a YMCA, where he took lessons until the act was perfected.
  • The birth scene was saved until the end of shooting, when Dreamlander Susan Lowe gave birth to a son. The umbilical cord was fashioned out of prophylactics filled with liver, while the baby (Ramsey McLean) was doused in fake blood. The scene created quite a scandal for Lowe's mother-in-law, who arrived on the set in a state of confusion.
  • Although Dawn Davenport received the death penalty at the end of the film, capital punishment in the United States was suspended from 1972 to 1976 due to the Supreme Court's ruling in the case of Furman v. Georgia.
  • On the 2004 DVD Director's Special Comments, Waters states that the original working title of the film was Rotten Mind, Rotten Face. In his autobiography Shock Value: A Tasteful Book About Bad Taste, he wrote that he changed the title when he realized some critic might title his review, "Rotten Mind, Rotten Face, Rotten Movie."
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