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Take Me Naked/Review

From The Grindhouse Cinema Database

< Take Me Naked
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The first sight - A good pair of breasts. The first voice - Someone reading poetry. Is this any way to start a Sexploitation film?!!! In the world of the Findlays, it is. It's pretty moody, so get ready for something that runs at a slower pace than usual perfect with the ad line's "rainy day on skid row" which sets the scene. When the viewer hears Micheal Findlay talk about "a mile long street of devastated humans" populated with "The wandering souls who desire nothing but the waters of forgetfulness" as the camera looks on the sad streets winding up in front of a generic liquor store, the scene is set for a place where every hour is the desperate hour.

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Take Me Naked is another example of Micheal and Roberta Findlay's high standing in the world of the New York Roughie in that in the hands of others, such films would only be half their power. The set up is basic, a poetry-reading drunk in the lower side of the city (Sullivan) lusts after a woman (Roberta Findlay) who gets involved in some lesbian moments in his daydreams, this time played out with Grindhouse legends June Roberts and Darlene Bennett, and then goes nuts after clubbing a man who walks into his room (Michael Findlay). When the leading bum gets a chance to meet the lady, the proof that he's crazed is made when he thinks he's bringing her flowers when in fact it's a carving knife.

Plenty of stock Classical Music records play along while poetry by Pierre Louys is read, leaving one with the feeling that the original audiences were not expecting this blend of Grindhouse and Arthouse, although the lesbian moments should have pleased quite a bit knowing that the three main ladies are among the best known of the New York Roughie Film scene. The effect is strong enough that the viewer is left with the feeling of living a very ran down building along with some finished bottles of gin that you're too lazy to throw away and very well read books and the photography really captures the down and out side of the city while also getting in some good erotica Findlay style. It's depressive, but in that very interesting kind of way.

To some, it's pioneering (I'm with that side), and to others it's too slow, but it's still another unique ride with the Findlays in their best era.

Reviewed by Screen13

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